Search The Rusted Garden Blog: Just Enter A Vegetable or Phrase

Tuesday, December 27, 2016

How to Wrap a Fig Tree for Winter Protection in Zone 7 - Tips, 3 layers, & Vented Top

How to Wrap a Fig Tree for Winter Protection in Zone 7 
Fig trees can take 20-25 degree F temperatures depending on the variety but when you get into consecutive days of of sub 20 degree temperatures the fig branches often freeze through and die. You want to protect them so you get figs the following year. If you don't protect them you often get new growth/branches that come up from the roots/ground but don't have enough time to produce the inverted flowers or fruit. You want to wrap you fig tree with 3 layers in Maryland Zone 7.


Good Luck with Your Garden,
Gary (The Rusted Garden)

Join My New YouTube Channel Just for NEW Gardeners: My First Vegetable Garden

Join My FB VIDEO Page - :The Rusted Garden FB Videos

Join My FB DISCUSSION Group - :The Rusted Garden: All About Vegetable Gardening

Simple Fall Division of Your Perennial Herbs Oregano, Thyme, Chives, Sage & Using a Soil Knife

Simple Fall Division of Your Perennial Herbs 
Oregano, Thyme, Chives, Sage & Using a Soil Knife

Please Visit The Rusted Garden Vegetable Seed and Garden Shop

Many herbs are perennials. A great time to divide them is in the fall after a frost. One tool I use regularly in the garden is a soil knife. It makes for quick divisions. Just dump out your container herbs or dig up a plant creating a nice root-ball and cut it into to pieces. Nothing fancy. Put the divisions in a temporary place and come spring, you'll have herb plants ready to be transplanted where you'd like. You can do this for most perennial plants including your flowers.





Good Luck with Your Garden,
Gary (The Rusted Garden)

Join My New YouTube Channel Just for NEW Gardeners: My First Vegetable Garden

Join My FB VIDEO Page - :The Rusted Garden FB Videos

Join My FB DISCUSSION Group - :The Rusted Garden: All About Vegetable Gardening

Sunday, December 18, 2016

The Rusted Garden is Selling Vegetable Seeds for 2017: Tomatoes and Herbs have Been Test Germinated!

The Rusted Garden is Selling Vegetable Seeds for 2017: 
Tomatoes and Herbs have Been Test Germinated!

Please Visit The Rusted Garden Vegetable Seed and Garden Shop

You can find all kinds of tomato seeds for sale on my blog. They have all been tested germinated and are ready for 2017 sale. I hand collect many of my tomato seeds. Herbs are also ready. You can find them down the left side of my blog.

My Test Germinated Tomatoes and Herbs 2017

Pepper seed and leafy greens are currently being test germinated. I buy these seeds in bulk and test the seeds I get. I should have them available in January.

Good Luck with Your Garden,
Gary (The Rusted Garden)

Join My New YouTube Channel Just for NEW Gardeners: My First Vegetable Garden

Join My FB VIDEO Page - :The Rusted Garden FB Videos

Join My FB DISCUSSION Group - :The Rusted Garden: All About Vegetable Gardening

Thursday, December 8, 2016

25 Pack Vegetable Seed Give-Away 2016: Join my FB group WINNER was PICKED 12/15/16



25 Pack Vegetable Seed Give-Away 2016
(Just Type the Words 'Enter Me' in Comments for a Chance to Win)

WINNER was PICKED 12/15/16

Join my FB Group Called Grow It Cook It Eat for a chance to win 25 packs of seeds. Just join, find the 25 Pack Seed Give-Away post and just say enter me in the comment section. Yep I am looking to bring members into my group and figured a seed give-away would be fun.



On December 15th I will randomly draw from new members of this group. Thanks so much for joining and inviting people. I am working on my seed starting videos this weekend for this group. And... please add your own videos and pictures to the group as it adds to everyone's experience.

Good Luck with Your Garden,
Gary (The Rusted Garden)

Join My New YouTube Channel Just for NEW Gardeners: My First Vegetable Garden

Join My FB VIDEO Page - :The Rusted Garden FB Videos

Join My FB DISCUSSION Group - :The Rusted Garden: All About Vegetable Gardening

Tuesday, November 29, 2016

Come Join My New Gardening Group Called: Grow It Cook It Eat! - We Will Be Discussing Seed Starting Herbs and More!

Come Join My New Gardening Group Called: Grow It Cook It Eat! -
We Will Be Discussing Seed Starting Herbs and More!

You are all invited!
Grow It Cook It Eat It FB Group - Come Join!

Please Visit The Rusted Garden Vegetable Seed and Garden Shop

Here's to a great gardening 2017 season. We do a video series called Grow It Cook It Eat It.


As we build members this month, we will be focusing, come January, on seed starting you own vegetables. January will start with lighting, seed starting supplies and starting herbs. Why not join our FB group and learn!

We are launching a Gardening and Cooking FB Group focused on sharing home grown food with family and friends. Check out the pinned description for details and group theme.  We have a big season planned for GCE 2017. I'll start be giving away 25 packs of seeds (mixed lot)  on December 15th to a randomly drawn new GCE member.

Grow It Cook It Eat It FB Group - Come Join!






Below is the description of the Grow It Cook It Eat FB group.


Coley and I welcome you to Grow It, Cook It, Eat It.

We started the GCE video series out of our passion for gardening and cooking.  We have big plans for 2017. We invite you to join us and everyone here!

This group will teach you how to grow and cook garden vegetables so you can share them with family and friends. We believe sharing home grown and home cooked food is so important, yet too often overlooked in life!

No question is to big or small. People come here to share and learn. This group is all about the vegetables and the people that you share them with!

We aren't here just to teach. We want to see what you have grown & cooked, your garden tips & recipes and any idea that makes Grow It Cook It Eat It a better place for everyone.

So go grow, cook and eat something with your family and friends!

Enjoy,
Coley & Gary





Friday, November 11, 2016

Using 100% Cold Pressed Neem Oil for Chewing Insects: Don't Get Fooled by Hydrophobic Extracts

Using 100% Cold Pressed Neem Oil for Chewing Insects:
Don't Get Fooled by Hydrophobic Extracts

Please Visit The Rusted Garden Vegetable Seed and Garden Shop 

I’ve been using organic 100% cold pressed Neem Oil with all its natural components for nearly 5 years in my garden to control chewing insects. If you are plagued by caterpillars/insects chewing your cabbage family, also known as the Brassicaceae family, plant leaves, you have an organic solution to stop them. That would include broccoli, cauliflower, kohlrabi, kale and other leafy green plant not in the family.

A natural component in Neem Oil called Azadirachtin will impair the systems of chewing insects when ingested. They will die off in a few days. The bonus is that once it is sprayed and dried, it will not harm other insects that come in contact with it. It has to be ingested. This product has been used in India for centuries. I highly recommend you search Neem Oil and India as a phrase. Historically, the story goes like this, locusts came and devastated large parts of India. The trees left standing with little damage to their leaves were the Neem Trees. They were skipped for a very good reason.

The nut from the Neem Tree is pressed and produces 100% cold pressed Neem Oil with all its natural components. Why is this important? All Neem Oil is not the same. We are misled and I hope to educate you so you can by the product you want for your garden.

Any oil based spray will smother and kill soft bodied insects but (generally) not caterpillars or hard bodied insects… any oil. The oil of choice must be sprayed onto the soft bodied insects to kill them. Neem Oil as an oil has this property too. If you spray it on soft bodied insects it will smoother them. However, that process is not what kills the chewing insects. It is the component called Azadirachtin that only comes in Neem Oil that does the killing. That is why you want 100% cold pressed Neem Oil. Your salad oil in your pantry can be used as a smothering oil.

Many products show the words NEEM OIL in bold on their packaging. Notice 100% Cold Pressed is not on them. Nor is the word Azadiracthin. The words you will find in the ingredients is often Hydrophobic Extract of Neem Oil. That means the company removed the good stuff, Azadiractin, and gave you Neem Oil that is useless but for smothering soft bodied insects and as a fungicide (all oils have fungicide properties). It may also state it is an insecticide because smothering oils can be called that.

You DO NOT have the azadirachtin that sits on the leaves for 7-10 days and kills chewing insects if you purchase a Hydrophobic Extract. This video explains the difference between Hydrophobic Extract of Neem Oil and Cold Pressed Neem Oil.
If you want to buy this, I sell this on my blog. It is 100% cold pressed with Azadirachtin. It is a little bit more expensive through me as I can’t compete with scale. However, the money goes back into the garden and garden videos. You can find it elsewhere but… make sure other oils are not cut into it and make sure it is 100% Cold Pressed Neem Oil with Azadirachtin. The Azadirachtin is what you want to purchase.
Good Luck with Your Garden,
Gary (The Rusted Garden)

Join My New YouTube Channel Just for NEW Gardeners: My First Vegetable Garden

Join My FB VIDEO Page - :The Rusted Garden FB Videos

Join My FB DISCUSSION Group - :The Rusted Garden: All About Vegetable Gardening

Tuesday, November 8, 2016

Show What You Grow (E1): 5 Vegetable Gardening Tips, Contest Winners & Bloopers

Show What You Grow (E1): 
5 Vegetable Gardening Tips,  Contest Winners & Bloopers


Welcome to Show What You Grow - E1. This is an ongoing collaboration series I am doing with CaliKim. She has a wonderful garden YT channel she shoots on the west coast. This series will offer garden tips from the both of us, plus it will show off 3-5 contest winners from our Instagram Garden contests. You can win a place in our next video by doing a 1 minute Instagram garden tour showing off what you are growing  and offering up one garden tip. Contest details and links to the winner's social media are below. And we decided to put a few blooper in at the end. Have fun and send us a video!




TracEy Monster's YT Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/TraceyMonster

Retro Flowers YT Channel:https://www.youtube.com/user/dezarae1984

House of Hurleys Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/houseofhurleys/

To join our contest follow both Kim and I on Instagram
Gary at The Rusted Garden: https://www.instagram.com/therustedgarden/
Kim at CaliKim29: https://www.instagram.com/calikim29/

We will launch contest details from Instgram as we ready for episode of Show What You Grow.


Good Luck with Your Garden,
Gary (The Rusted Garden)

Join My New YouTube Channel Just for NEW Gardeners: My First Vegetable Garden

Join My FB VIDEO Page - :The Rusted Garden FB Videos

Join My FB DISCUSSION Group - :The Rusted Garden: All About Vegetable Gardening

Saturday, October 29, 2016

Growing Organic Garlic in Containers and Earth Beds: Fall Planting

Growing Organic Garlic 
in Containers and Earth Beds: Fall Planting
Gary Pilarchik (The Rusted Garden)

Gary Pilarchik (The Rusted Garden)
There are two general categories for garlic and they are either softneck garlic or hardneck garlic. I recommend you do a search for zone planting of garlic and it will tell you which garlic type is best suited for your area. I am in Maryland Zone 7 and my zone is kind of like the buffer zone for both types. As you go more north, you would look to grow hardneck varieties. As you go more south you would look to grow softneck varieties. I grow both.

The key to planting garlic in the fall is to plant when the cool fall weather arrives and stays. You want your garlic to establish a strong root system over the fall but not grow lots of green growth. If you plant it when it is too warm, it will send up green shoots. Some green growth is fine. When the nights in your area start to stay in the 50's that is a great time to plant your garlic. I plant mine in late October. When you see the tree leaves turning colors... get your garlic in the ground.

Garlic should be planted in loose well draining soil. It doesn't like to sit in damp earth as it creates disease issues. The planting depth will vary between 2 inches to 6 inches as you want the cloves to be planted below the freeze level of the ground. I plant mine, in containers, at a 6 inch depth as containers freeze more deeply during my winters. I plant them 4 inches deep in my earth beds as the earth holds heat better. The ground beds get about an inch of freeze during our coldest months. You can also put several inches of straw or mulch on your beds to insulate the ground. Just remove it come spring. That is a great tip for more northern zones. This is how I plant garlic in my containers.




I use a balanced 5-5-5 (or close to that as I buy what is on sale) organic fertilizer for most of  my garlic and most of my vegetable plants. That is 5 (N)itrogen-5 (P)hosphorous-5 (K)/Potassium which is your N-P-K values. You really don't need more than that for most vegetables. However, fertilizers vary greatly. Try and stay in the middle of a 1-1-1 and a 10-10-10. The numbers do not need to be balanced. This is just a guideline. In fact for bulb development phosphorus is really important. While a 5-5-5 will work just fine to establish the bed or container, I like to boost mine with Bone Meal which is a 2-14-0 fertilizer.  The high phosphorous helps bulb growth.

The earth bed garlic video will detail the fertilizers. Don't stress about it. Just use this as a guideline. Come spring you want to feed your garlic with a water soluble organic fertilizer and try to find one that has a higher P or phosphorous value over N or nitrogen. You want bulb growth and not leaf growth in the case of garlic.

Spacing is pretty simple. I plant the cloves 4-6 inches apart based on the size of the bulb development when mature. If in doubt stay at the 6 inch spacing. And remember, you are not planting a whole garlic bulb but a portion of it called the clove. Row spacing, I keep the same at 4-6 inches. Although some people recommend 8-10 inches between rows, I have not found the value in giving up the extra space. You'll notice in the videos that  my container garlic gets planted more closely together. That will inhibit, to some degree, the bulb size but you can help off-set that with extra water soluble feedings.




You don't really need to water the garlic cloves in at planting as the weather is cool. Watering it twice a week is plenty come the warming end of spring. Watering is more important for container garlic then earth bed garlic. If you notice buds on the tips of your garlic growth as summer approaches, remove them. You don't went energy going into flowering/scapes. Garlic, in my zone, is ready to harvest come mid to late June. The green growth will brown and fall over.  Now I like to pick some early. I use it in salad dressings and in cooking.  I even use the leaves in scrambled eggs.

You can purchase your garlic on line. It is a great way to find different varieties of softneck and hardneck garlics suited to your taste desires and planting zone. Garlic from grocery stores can be used. I have used it for years. Even if your garlic fails to a degree, you will get a bulb of some size and be able to use it your kitchen. Just plant a bulb and give it a try! You only learn by doing.


Good Luck with Your Garden,
Gary (The Rusted Garden)

Join My New YouTube Channel Just for NEW Gardeners: My First Vegetable Garden

Join My FB VIDEO Page - :The Rusted Garden FB Videos

Join My FB DISCUSSION Group - :The Rusted Garden: All About Vegetable Gardening

Saturday, September 10, 2016

Cool Season Vegetable Crops (Spring & Fall): Facts and Planting - Revised 2016

Cool Season Vegetable Crops (Spring & Fall)


A  Mix of Cool Weather Vegetables: The Rusted Garden


Please Visit The Rusted Garden Vegetable Seed and Garden Shop

What Makes A  Vegetable a Cool Weather Vegetable?
The cell structures of vegetables differ in that some vegetables have plant cells that will burst if they freeze or encounter even a light frost.. Cool weather vegetables tend to have the ability to freeze without cell damage. They are designed for the cooler temperatures. The cells can freeze and defrost in the sun with out damage to the plant leaf. When a extend cold comes that will freeze the roots or area where the roots meet the stem, that is when the plant usually dies or is damaged. So you have a lot of time to grow cool season vegetables!



Fully Frozen and Survived: The Rusted Garden

Cool season vegetables prefer the cooler weather. This group of vegetables grows best and tastes their best with 50 degree (F) nights and 60-70 degree (F) days. Cool weather vegetables can be broken into two sub-categories which are Hardy and Semi-Hardy.

Why Can’t I Plant Them When It Is Hot??
Many of the cool weather vegetables try and set seed when it gets warm. Lettuces, for example, don’t mature to full heads and grow quickly to flower and set seeds when the warmth comes. This is aprocess called ‘bolting’. Most lettuces will also become bitter tasting when it is get regularly warm.

Radishes become woody and also ‘bolt’. The cool weather allows vegetables time to mature slowly and it inhibits (slows) the ‘bolting’ process. Kale is a hardy cool weather crop that tastes sweeter when‘cool grown’ but it can be grown through the whole season in many locations.

Hardy Cool Weather Vegetables: 
This group of vegetables can manage well with mid 40 degree days and can survive a strong frost. Many vegetables in this group can over-winter in your garden and bring you early spring greens. Vegetables in this group can be planted up to 4 weeks before the average last frost date in your area. You can probably even get away with 6 weeks if you like pushing garden limits.

Semi-Hardy Cool Weather Vegetables: 
This group of vegetables doesn’t fare as well with frost although they can handle a light frosting with minimal to no damage. They prefer daytime temperatures in the 50’s and nights that don’t fall below 40 degrees, although they can handle nights in the 30’s. Vegetables in this group can be planted up to 2-4 weeks before the average last frost date in your area.

A Cool Weather Tip
In places with warm to hot summers, you actually have two cool weather seasons. I plant in Maryland Zone 7. I can start my cool weather planting March 1st and I can plant them again mid August for a fall cool season. I actually plant at this time to also establish vegetables that I will let over-winter.

Different Types of Cool Weather Vegetables

The exact split, between hardy (H) and semi-hardy (SH), and where to place a vegetable in the sub-categories is debated. It is best used for general planting guidelines and understanding they simply like the cool weather. My guidelines for each vegetable is based on my growing area (Zone 7). I am giving you the general range for first planting of these vegetables. You can plant successive crops every 2 weeks as you wish based on you planting zone.


Some Cool Weather Vegetable Crops: The Rusted Garden

Asparagus (H) (Perennial) It takes about 3 years to establish a viable crop. It is a perennial plant that will start sending up stalks in March when planted the previous year. If you are planting it for the first time to establish it your garden, it is best to use transplants. You can grow them from seed in cell trays. They should be planting in the garden in May.

Arugula (SH) It can be started indoors and planted in the garden 2 weeks before last frost date. You can also plant seeds at the same time.

Beets (SH) It can be planted as seeds 2 weeks before last frost date. I have had success growing transplants.

Bok Choy (Pak Choi) (H) It can be planted as seeds directly in the garden 2-4 weeks before last frost date. I do recommend growing it indoors and transplanting it into the garden 2-4 weeks before last frost date.

Broccoli (H) It is best planted as a transplant 4 weeks before last frost date. I would not recommend starting it as seeds in the ground in Zone 7.

Brussels sprouts (H) It is best planted as a transplant 2 weeks before last frost date. I would not recommend starting it as seeds in the ground in Zone 7.

Cabbage (H) It is best planted as a transplant 4 weeks before last frost date. I would not recommend starting it as seeds in the ground in Zone 7.

Carrots (SH) Carrots should not be grown as transplants. They can be seeded in your garden 2-4 weeks before last frost date.

Cauliflower (H) It is best planted as a transplant 2-4 weeks before last frost date. I would not recommend starting it as seeds in the ground in Zone 7.

Celery (SH) It is best planted as a transplant 2 weeks before last frost date. I would not recommend starting it as seeds in the ground in Zone 7.

Cilantro (H) It can be planted as seeds directly in the garden 2-4 weeks before last frost date.

Collard Greens (H) It can be planted as seeds directly in the garden 2-4 weeks before last frost date. I do recommend growing it indoors and transplanting it into the garden 2-4 weeks before last frost date.

Fennel (H) It can be planted as seeds directly in the garden 2-4 weeks before last frost date. I do recommend growing it indoors and transplanting it into the garden 2-4 weeks before last frost date.

Kale (H) It can be planted as seeds directly in the garden 2-4 weeks before last frost date. I do recommend growing it indoors and transplanting it into the garden 2-4 weeks before last frost date.

Kohlrabi (H) It can be started indoors and planted in the garden 2 weeks before last frost date. You can also plant seeds at the same time.

Lettuce (H) It can be started indoors and planted in the garden 4 weeks before last frost date. You can also plant seeds at the same time.

Mustard Greens (H) It can be planted as seeds directly in the garden 2-4 weeks before last frost date. I do recommend growing it indoors and transplanting it into the garden 2-4 weeks before last frost date.

Onions (H) If you are using bulbs you can plant them 6 weeks before last frost date. I have not used seeds.

Parsley (H) It can be planted as seeds directly in the garden 2-4 weeks before last frost date. I do recommend growing it indoors and transplanting it into the garden 2-4 weeks before last frost date.

Peas (SH) They should be planted directly in the ground 4 weeks before last frost date. Peas do not like soggy cold soil.

Potatoes (SH) They should be planted directly in the ground 4 weeks before last frost date.

Radishes (H) They should be planted directly in the ground 4 weeks before last frost date.

Spinach (H) It can be planted as seeds directly in the garden 2-4 weeks before last frost date. I do recommend growing it indoors and transplanting it into the garden 2-4 weeks before last frost date.

Chard (SH) It can be planted as seeds directly in the garden 2-4 weeks before last frost date. I do recommend growing it indoors and transplanting it into the garden 2-4 weeks before last frost date.

Turnips (H) They should be planted directly in the ground 4 weeks before last frost date


More Cool Weather Vegetable Crops: The Rusted Garden

Good Luck with Your Garden,
Gary (The Rusted Garden)

Join My New YouTube Channel Just for NEW Gardeners: My First Vegetable Garden

Join My FB VIDEO Page - :The Rusted Garden FB Videos

Join My FB DISCUSSION Group - :The Rusted Garden: All About Vegetable Gardening

Thursday, August 25, 2016

Squash & Zucchini (Pests/Pollination) Grow It, Cook It, Eat It - A Garden & Cooking Series E- 3

Squash & Zucchini (Pests/Pollination)  
Grow It, Cook It, Eat It - A Garden & Cooking Series E- 3


Coley and I are excited to present our 3rd episode of Grow It, Cook It, Eat It. You can find the recipe and other garden links below.

This episode is all about Squash and Zucchini. Coley presents 5 tips on cooking and storing the vegetables which includes Zoodles. I focus on pollination and why fruit browns. I also talk at length about identifying and controlling squash bugs, beetles and vine borers. I grow my S & Z up cages and supports for easy spraying. And most importantly, don't forget to eat what you grow and cook, with your family and friends!

Cheers!
Coley and Gary





Good Luck with Your Garden,
Gary (The Rusted Garden)

Join My New YouTube Channel Just for NEW Gardeners: My First Vegetable Garden

Join My FB VIDEO Page - :The Rusted Garden FB Videos

Join My FB DISCUSSION Group - :The Rusted Garden: All About Vegetable Gardening

Tuesday, August 2, 2016

Growing Tomatoes and Peppers From Start To Finish: A 9 Video Garden Series


Growing Tomatoes and Peppers From Start To Finish

Please Visit The Rusted Garden Vegetable Seed and Garden Shop


Growing Tomatoes

This is a 9 part series I just finished and it is hosted on one of my two garden YouTube Channels - My First Vegetable Garden. It holds nearly 200 garden videos for new gardeners.

The 9 videos take you from seed starting tomatoes and peppers to hopefully a wonderful harvest. In between you can find all the steps on planting, feeding, tending and manage pests and disease.

I've included all 9 videos on this page with their video descriptions. If you enjoy this series please check out my channel linked above.

Growing Peppers

(1 of 9) Growing Tomatoes and Peppers: 
When to Seed Start,  Starting Mix, Light, Watering and Feeding

This is a 9 part series that takes you from seed starting to picking tomatoes and peppers. The 1st video shows you how to seed start your tomatoes and peppers indoors. I show you how to prepare the starting mix, how to prevent fungus and insects, when to fertilize, how and when to water and a bit about lighting. And I tell you when to start them. This is a series you can follow to grow your own tomatoes and peppers. Makes sure you have annotations on as I add information in text boxes.




(2 of 9) Growing Tomatoes and Peppers: 
Acclimation (to Sun), Fertilizing and Cup Transplanting Peppers

This is a 9 part series that takes you from seed starting to picking tomatoes and peppers. This is the 2nd video.  I shows you how to transplant the peppers into cups in 3 ways and how to fertilize them. I also talk about acclimating them to the sun.  This is a series you can follow to grow your own tomatoes and peppers.




(3 of 9) Growing Tomatoes and Peppers: 
True Leaves and Fertilizing, Purple Stems and Cinnamon Anti-Fungal

This is the 3rd video in a 9 part series about growing tomatoes and peppers from seed starting to harvesting. This video shows you when to fertilizer your tomato starts (1st True Leaves) and discusses water soluble fertilizer and how much to use. I give you an update on the pepper transplants, talk about purple pepper stems, how to use neem oil for insects, cinnamon as an anti-fungal and the way I label my seedlings.




(4 of 9) Growing Tomatoes and  Peppers: 
Cup Transplanting Tomatoes, Fertilizing, Stem Bumps and Tips 

This is the 4th video in a 9 part series about growing tomatoes and peppers from seed starting to harvesting. I show you how to transplant the tomatoes into cups and talk about fertilizing. I also show you some over-grown tomatoes in starter cells that are doing well from processed fertilizers. The tomato stems have bumps, this occurs on many stems and it is nothing to worry about. Make sure you have annotations on. There are lots of notes.




(5 of 9) Growing Tomatoes and Peppers: 
Pruning Peppers, No Flowering, Feeding and Progress

This is the 5th video in a 9 part series on growing tomatoes and peppers from start to harvesting. This video quickly explains why you would and how to prune peppers. It is a great way to get stronger more productive plants.. Feed your tomatoes ever 10-14 days with a water soluble fertilizer and don't let them flower while you wait for final transplanting.




(6 of 9) Growing Tomatoes and Peppers:
Pepper Planting, Container Soil, Basic Feeding and Tomato Progress

This is the 6th video of 9.  Peppers and tomatoes like the warmth and generally like to be planted when the nights are in the 50's and the days are in the 70's.  Too much nitrogen grows a lot of pepper leaves. While tomatoes love to be fed, a bit less for peppers is better. I talk about some basic fertilizing principles and how to make a basic container soil. I also show you how to plant your peppers in containers and in earth beds. Tomatoes show up in the video to but they will be the star of the next video.



(7 of 9) Growing Tomatoes and Peppers:
Prevention, Splash Barrier, Aspirin and Sprays, Planting

In video #7 I talk about disease prevention. Mulch is used for moisture and weeds but also as a disease splash barrier. Bottom pruning leaves helps create a disease barrier. Slugs are treated with Iron phosphate and I plant my indeterminate tomatoes. Finally I talk about Aspirin spray (which really works) for bolstering you tomato plant's defenses. Baking soda makes a great anti-fungal.




(8 of 9) Growing Tomatoes and Peppers:
Side Dressing, Pruning, Suckers, Removing Leaves and Sprays

Video #8 of 9 gets your tomatoes and peppers ready for growth and production. I show you how I remove bottom leaves from my peppers and talk about fertilizing them. They don't need much. I also show you how I stake, prune and remove suckers from tomato plants. I explain what a production stem is and discuss why you may want to manage stems on your tomatoes. I also show you how to side dress tomatoes with fertilizer and lime.




(9 of 9) Growing Tomatoes and Peppers:
My Harvest, Saving Tomato and Pepper Seeds, Final Tour

Thanks for watching this series: Growing Tomatoes & Peppers. This is the final video of the series. I show you my harvest, how to save tomato and pepper seeds (for next year!) and give you my final tour of the tomato and pepper gardens.





Good Luck with Your Garden,
Gary (The Rusted Garden)

Join My New YouTube Channel Just for NEW Gardeners: My First Vegetable Garden

Join My FB VIDEO Page - :The Rusted Garden FB Videos

Join My FB DISCUSSION Group - :The Rusted Garden: All About Vegetable Gardening

Saturday, July 16, 2016

The Difference Between Determinate & Indeterminate Tomatoes



The Difference Between 
Determinate & Indeterminate Tomatoes

Please Visit The Rusted Garden Vegetable Seed and Garden Shop

There are generally two types of tomato plant categories. A tomato plant is either a determinate plant or an indeterminate plant. You may come across tomatoes called semi-determinate, however, you can treat them as a slower growing indeterminate tomato plant variety.

Clusters of  Determinate Tomatoes
Ripen Together for a Large Harvest
Determinates Mature Together
A determinate tomato grows to a set height and stops growing or greatly slows growth. They may be anywhere from 1-5 feet tall.

The determinate variety tomatoes tend to set all of their flowers over a very short period of time.

You will often see clusters of  green tomatoes that seem to appear all at once. They also tend to ripen together quickly, be ready for a large harvest.

The determinate plant typically begins to die off while the fruits are in the later stages of maturing.  Often, while the fruits mature, you will notice the plant leaves yellowing and dying off. This is a normal process for the plant.

Determinate types of tomatoes are great for getting early tomatoes from your garden and they do well in containers and in small spaces. You can often plant two rounds of determinate tomatoes in your garden, where you have about 5 months of warm weather. They can be planted in May and again in mid July.

Staked Indeterminate Tomatoes
The indeterminate tomato variety continues to grow and grow until frost or disease takes the plant. These plants can easily get to 6, 7, 8 feet tall and even taller. It will set flowers and fruit throughout the entire growing season. Typically, it produces several leaves, a cluster of flowers, several leaves and a cluster of flowers. This general pattern repeats, as tomatoes are vines.

Only frost or disease will stop an indeterminate tomato from growing and setting new flower clusters.  Think of it this way, a determinate tomato grows to a predetermined size and stops. Indeterminate tomatoes often need to be staked and pruned to manage their vigorous continuous growth.

Flower Cluster Form Tomatoes Over the Whole Season




A 'Sucker' in the Joint About to Be Pruned Out


I recommend slowly pruning the bottom leaves of indeterminate tomatoes and removing some suckers over the growing season. Pruning helps with airflow around and through the plant and it is done to help manage diseases and excessive growth. When and how much to prune is the gardener's choice.

You can often find out whether or not your tomato plant is an determinate or indeterminate plant variety from the seed pack. If you happen to buy a transplant or can't find what type it is, search the name on the internet. Very often you will find seed companies that carry your tomato variety and the plant description will tell you what type of growth to expect.

Tomatoes form from the bottom up on indeterminate plants. The lower part of the plant holds older tomatoes that mature and ripen. New flowers and tomatoes are found toward the top of the plant, as it grows.

The 'suckers' that form in the joints of leaves and stems will also produce flowers and continue to grow. Indeterminate plants are often pruned to limit production while determinate tomatoes should rarely be pruned.

Pruned and Staked Indeterminate Varieties
A Cluster of Green Tomatoes Mature 

Indeterminate Varieties Set Fruit Over the Season





Good Luck with Your Garden,
Gary (The Rusted Garden)



Join My New YouTube Channel Just for NEW Gardeners: My First Vegetable Garden

Join My FB VIDEO Page - :The Rusted Garden FB Videos

Join My FB DISCUSSION Group - :The Rusted Garden: All About Vegetable Gardening

Tuesday, July 5, 2016

Kale & Kale Pests: Grow It, Cook It, Eat It - A Garden & Cooking Series E- 2 (Pilot)

 Kale & Kale Pests: Grow It, Cook It, Eat It
A Garden & Cooking Series E- 2 (Pilot)

Please Visit The Rusted Garden Vegetable Seed and Garden Shop

Coley and I are excited to present our 2nd episode of Grow It, Cook It, Eat It. You can find the recipe and other garden links below.

This episode is all about Kale and it is a little heavier on the Grow It side. Kale is easy to grow and a great crop, if you can manage 3 annoying pests. I spend time showing you how to do just that. Coley has 5 tips for you to tame that delicious yet sometimes dirty leaf. She shows you how to prepare it, dry it, crisp it, blend it and even massage it. And don't forget to eat what you grow and cook, with your family and friends.


Cheers!
Coley and Gary



Join My New YouTube Channel Just for NEW Gardeners: My First Vegetable Garden

Join My FB VIDEO Page - :The Rusted Garden FB Videos

Join My FB DISCUSSION Group - :The Rusted Garden: All About Vegetable Gardening

Friday, June 24, 2016

Growing Cherry Tomatoes in Containers: Container, Soil, Fertilizers, Planting - A KIS Series (1/3)

Growing Cherry Tomatoes in Containers: 
Container, Soil, Fertilizers, Planting - A KIS Series (1/3)

I am starting a new series called KIS or (K)eep (I)t (S)imple. It is for new gardeners and my goal is to help you get to growing vegetables. I try and simplify the tools and methods.




Good Luck with Your Garden,
Gary (The Rusted Garden)

Join My New YouTube Channel Just for NEW Gardeners: My First Vegetable Garden

Join My FB VIDEO Page - :The Rusted Garden FB Videos

Join My FB DISCUSSION Group - :The Rusted Garden: All About Vegetable Gardening

Wednesday, June 22, 2016

(8 of 9) Growing Tomatoes & Peppers: Side Dressing, Pruning, Suckers, Removing Leaves, Sprays

(8 of 9) Growing Tomatoes & Peppers: 
Side Dressing, Pruning, Suckers, Removing Leaves, Sprays

Please Visit The Rusted Garden Vegetable Seed and Garden Shop

Video #8 of 9 gets your tomatoes and peppers ready for growth and production. I show you how I remove bottom leaves from my peppers and talk about fertilizing them. They don't need much. I also show you how I stake, prune and remove suckers from tomato plants. I explain what a production stem is and discuss why you may want to manage stems on your tomatoes. I also show you how to side dress tomatoes with fertilizer and lime.




Good Luck with Your Garden,
Gary (The Rusted Garden)

Join My New YouTube Channel Just for NEW Gardeners: My First Vegetable Garden

Join My FB VIDEO Page - :The Rusted Garden FB Videos

Join My FB DISCUSSION Group - :The Rusted Garden: All About Vegetable Gardening

(7 of 9) Growing Tomatoes & Peppers: Prevention, Splash Barrier, Aspirin & Sprays, Planting

(7 of 9) Growing Tomatoes & Peppers: 
Prevention, Splash Barrier, Aspirin & Sprays, Planting

Please Visit The Rusted Garden Vegetable Seed and Garden Shop

In video #7 I talk about disease prevention. Mulch is used for moisture and weeds but also as a disease splash barrier. Bottom pruning leaves helps create a disease barrier. Slugs are treated with Iron phosphate and I plant my indeterminate tomatoes. Finally I talk about Aspirin spray (which really works) for bolstering you tomato plant's defenses. Baking soda makes a great anti-fungal.




Good Luck with Your Garden,
Gary (The Rusted Garden)

Join My New YouTube Channel Just for NEW Gardeners: My First Vegetable Garden

Join My FB VIDEO Page - :The Rusted Garden FB Videos

Join My FB DISCUSSION Group - :The Rusted Garden: All About Vegetable Gardening

Wednesday, June 8, 2016

(6 of 9) Growing Tomatoes & Peppers: Pepper Planting, Container Soil, Basic Feeding, Tomato Progress

(6 of 9) Growing Tomatoes & Peppers: 
Pepper Planting, Container Soil, Basic Feeding, Tomato Progress 

Please Visit The Rusted Garden Vegetable Seed and Garden Shop

This is the 6th video of 9. Peppers and tomatoes like the warmth and generally like to be planted when the nights are in the 50's and the days are in the 70's. Too much nitrogen grows a lot of pepper leaves. While tomatoes love to be fed, a bit less for peppers is better. I talk about some basic fertilizing principles and how to make a basic container soil. I also show you how to plant your peppers in containers and in earth beds. Tomatoes show up in the video to but they will be the star of the next video.


Good Luck with Your Garden,
Gary (The Rusted Garden)

Join My New YouTube Channel Just for NEW Gardeners: My First Vegetable Garden

Join My FB VIDEO Page - :The Rusted Garden FB Videos

Join My FB DISCUSSION Group - :The Rusted Garden: All About Vegetable Gardening

Saturday, June 4, 2016

Radishes & Chives: Grow It, Cook It, Eat It - A Garden & Cooking Series E-1 (Pilot)

Radishes & Chives: Grow It, Cook It, Eat It 
A Garden & Cooking Series E-1  (Pilot)

Please Visit The Rusted Garden Vegetable Seed and Garden Shop

Coley and I are very excited to launch the Pilot of our new series: Grow It, Cook It, Eat It. Please leaves us constructive comments, as we both value and want your help in developing the series.

Episode 1 is all about Radishes and Chives. I teach you how to grow them and Coley shows you how to prepare and use them in the kitchen. What we hope most is that you... get to enjoy something you grew and cooked with your family and friends. Cheers!




Good Luck with Your Garden,
Gary (The Rusted Garden)

Join My New YouTube Channel Just for NEW Gardeners: My First Vegetable Garden

Join My FB VIDEO Page - :The Rusted Garden FB Videos

Join My FB DISCUSSION Group - :The Rusted Garden: All About Vegetable Gardening

Sunday, May 8, 2016

On Vacation: All Items Ordered 5/9 through 5/13 Won't be Shipped Until 5/16


Back From Vacation:
All Orders are Going Out
Monday 5/16 and Tuesday 5/17.
Thank You!


On Vacation: 
All Items Ordered 5/9 through 5/13 
Won't be Shipped Until 5/16

I am going to be a way on a garden related business trip which is very exciting. However, I wont be able to 
fill seed orders and neem oil orders until I return on 5/14. 
That means most things will be mailed out Monday 5/16. 


Good Luck with Your Garden,
Gary (The Rusted Garden)

Join My New YouTube Channel Just for NEW Gardeners: My First Vegetable Garden

Join My FB VIDEO Page - :The Rusted Garden FB Videos

Join My FB DISCUSSION Group - :The Rusted Garden: All About Vegetable Gardening

Wednesday, April 20, 2016

(5 of 9) Growing Tomatoes & Peppers: Pruning Peppers, No Flowering, Feeding & Progress

(5 of 9) Growing Tomatoes & Peppers: 
Pruning Peppers, No Flowering, Feeding & Progress

Please Visit The Rusted Garden Vegetable Seed and Garden Shop

This is the 5th video in a 9 part series on growing tomatoes and peppers from start to harvesting. This video quickly explains why you would and how to prune peppers. It is a great way to get stronger more productive plants.. Feed your tomatoes ever 10-14 days with a water soluble fertilizer and don't let them flower while you wait for final transplanting.




Good Luck with Your Garden,
Gary (The Rusted Garden)

Join My New YouTube Channel Just for NEW Gardeners: My First Vegetable Garden

Join My FB VIDEO Page - :The Rusted Garden FB Videos

Join My FB DISCUSSION Group - :The Rusted Garden: All About Vegetable Gardening

(4 of 9) Growing Tomatoes & Peppers: Cup Transplanting Tomatoes, Fertilizing, Stem Bumps, Tips

(4 of 9) Growing Tomatoes & Peppers: 
Cup Transplanting Tomatoes, Fertilizing, Stem Bumps, Tips

Please Visit The Rusted Garden Vegetable Seed and Garden Shop

This is the 4th video in a 9 part series about growing tomatoes and peppers from seed starting to harvesting. I show you how to transplant the tomatoes into cups and talk about fertilizing. I also show you some over-grown tomatoes in starter cells that are doing well from processed fertilizers. The tomato stems have bumps, this occurs on many stems and it is nothing to worry about. Make sure you have annotations on. There are lots of notes.



Good Luck with Your Garden,
Gary (The Rusted Garden)

Join My New YouTube Channel Just for NEW Gardeners: My First Vegetable Garden

Join My FB VIDEO Page - :The Rusted Garden FB Videos

Join My FB DISCUSSION Group - :The Rusted Garden: All About Vegetable Gardening

(3 of 9) Growing Tomatoes & Peppers: True Leaves & Fertilizing, Purple Stems, Cinnamon Anti-Fungal

(3 of 9) Growing Tomatoes & Peppers: 
True Leaves & Fertilizing, Purple Stems, Cinnamon Anti-Fungal

Please Visit The Rusted Garden Vegetable Seed and Garden Shop

This is the 3rd video in a 9 part series about growing tomatoes and peppers from seed starting to harvesting. This video shows you when to fertilizer your tomato starts (1st True Leaves) and discusses water soluble fertilizer and how much to use. I give you an update on the pepper transplants, talk about purple pepper stems, how to use neem oil for insects, cinnamon as an anti-fungal and the way I label my seedlings.



Good Luck with Your Garden,
Gary (The Rusted Garden)

Join My New YouTube Channel Just for NEW Gardeners: My First Vegetable Garden

Join My FB VIDEO Page - :The Rusted Garden FB Videos

Join My FB DISCUSSION Group - :The Rusted Garden: All About Vegetable Gardening

Saturday, April 9, 2016

Quick Ideas for Frost Protection of Plants in a Vegetable Garden

Quick Ideas for Frost Protection of Plants in a Vegetable Garden

Please Visit The Rusted Garden Vegetable Seed and Garden Shop




Well as the story goes... "What? Frost this time of year. Are you kidding me?" This is the time of the season where we have put out a lot of our plants, some warm weather plants, but mostly the cool weather crops. Luckily the cool weather crops can take a frost and the leaves can freeze. The problem is that we don't want their roots systems to freeze. And any frost damages the warm weather crops.




If we get a light frost, the cool weather plants survive. The leaves might get beat up and new ones may need to grow but the plant survives. Cool weather crop leaves can freeze and survive. The warm weather plants leaves can't do this and are destroyed if they freeze.

If the root system or area where the roots and stem meet, freeze out hard, the plant can die. So with a 25 degree night on the horizon... here are some tips that I will use to add some protection to my cold weather crops like kale, lettuces, broccoli, endives, beets and kohlrabi.





Good Luck with Your Garden,
Gary (The Rusted Garden)

Join My New YouTube Channel Just for NEW Gardeners: My First Vegetable Garden

Join My FB VIDEO Page - :The Rusted Garden FB Videos

Join My FB DISCUSSION Group - :The Rusted Garden: All About Vegetable Gardening

Sunday, March 27, 2016

Identifying Slug and Snail Damage: Using Iron Phosphate to Effectively Kill and Manage Snails and Slugs

Identifying Slug and Snail Damage: 
Using Iron Phosphate to Effectively Kill and Manage Snails and Slugs


Slugs and snails are common in most gardens. They love leafy greens. They come out with the warming spring rains. I found the best way to manage them is with Iron Phosphate baited pellets. It can be used in organic gardens.

Please Visit The Rusted Garden Vegetable Seed and Garden Shop




I had such a problem that anything green would be destroyed.I had small snails that would chew 100's of holes in plants like Chinese Cabbage and Bok Choy. The larger slugs would make large holes in my Kohlrabi and Cabbages. The cabbage heads would form and I would find many many small snails in them.

Iron Phosphate is so effective, I forget I have a problem. As long as I use it regularly, I notice little, if any damage. I use it about every 2 weeks and I don't over sprinkle/concentrate it around the garden. A nice light broadcasting of the pellets is all you need.





Good Luck with Your Garden,
Gary (The Rusted Garden)

Join My New YouTube Channel Just for NEW Gardeners: My First Vegetable Garden

Join My FB VIDEO Page - :The Rusted Garden FB Videos

Join My FB DISCUSSION Group - :The Rusted Garden: All About Vegetable Gardening

If You Use Amazon, Please Support The Rusted Garden via My Amazon Affilate